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Are Beagles Good Apartment Dogs?

Are Beagles Good Apartment Dogs?

Beagles are a favorite among dog lovers, and with good reasons. They are everything you could want in a dog; they are friendly, sociable, loyal companions, fun-loving, and are always full of life and energy. The majority of Beagle lovers choose them because of their appearance and personality. But when choosing a dog to bring home, one shouldn’t just think about what they want, but what is good for the dog as well. Can you offer a Beagle the type of environment that they will be happy in? With many people living in apartments where space is at a premium, Beagles living in apartments can be controversial, as with many other dog breeds.



So, can Beagles live in apartments? Beagles are highly adaptable dogs, and their small size won’t pose much of a size problem in apartment living. However, their high energy levels and vocal nature can be problematic. They must be well-trained so as not to resort to destructive behaviors. You’ll also need to provide physical and mental stimulation daily in the form of outdoor exercise and interactive indoor playtime.


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Indeed, Beagles (scent hounds) generally love to run, explore and are happy when they can satisfy their sniffing desires and see where it leads them. In an ideal situation, they would thrive in a large, fenced yard, but just because you don’t have a yard doesn’t mean you can’t have a dog. You should note that some apartments are even larger than some houses. But regardless of the size, what truly matters is the size of your heart and ability to provide the training, exercise, and companionship that they require. Beagles will make lovely apartment companions in your small living space. So, let’s see how you can make apartment living easy for them.



Are Beagles Good Apartment Dogs?

Yes, Beagles can be great apartment dogs. They can be comfortable and happy in a small living situation, allowing them to relax and be with their owner. But what exactly makes them an excellent choice for these types of owners:

They Are Just the Right Size – While there are large apartments, most are known for their premium space. Beagles are 13-15 inches tall and weigh 18-30 pounds, classifying them as small to medium-sized dogs. With this size, Beagles can move about freely and comfortably in apartment housing.



Even Temperaments – Beagles are neither too aggressive nor too timid; they are just mild dogs. When a dog is left in small spaces, many things can go wrong, and you want them to cope with unpredictable situations. This is why even-tempered family dogs make great dogs for apartments. This doesn’t mean the Beagle is calm; rather, they are tolerable and not easily stressed or annoyed from situations.

Beagles are Adaptable Dogs – Beagles’ even temperament makes them easy-going. They also have adaptive intelligence, which refers to the dog’s ability to learn on their own. This enables them to quickly adapt to different living situations, including living in an apartment building.



Cons of Raising This Breed in an Apartment

Though Beagles make excellent apartment dogs, some qualities can make them less ideal for this living situation. For starters, they are highly energetic and will need a certain amount of physical exercise every day. Since there’s no backyard where they can run and play, you’ll need to take them outside for frequent walks. The amount of adequate exercise you Beagle receives is crucial to their physical and mental wellbeing.

As pack dogs, Beagles thrive on companionship, making them prone to separation anxiety when left alone for long periods. They will turn to destructive behavior like digging, chewing, occasional barking, and excessive shedding. Since they’re very vocal, they will not hesitate to express their feelings through excessive barking, whining, and howling. Apartment buildings have crowded units, and these sounds may travel further than you think, upsetting many neighbors and leading to loud noises and noise complaints from your neighbors.



Are Beagles Good Indoor Dogs?

Beagles were originally bred for hunting and spent most of their days in the wild hunting for game. But with time, they have become a popular choice for house pets due to their affectionate and friendly nature. This makes you wonder if they are best suited for outdoor or indoor living.

Despite being hunting dogs, Beagles were never suited for outdoor living. They have a short coat that doesn’t do much, protecting them from extreme cold and hot temperatures. Also, being pack dogs, they crave companionship. Living outside may result in them running away to seek adventure and company. Therefore, Beagles are best as inside dogs. Of course, there’s more to it. Beagles still prefer spending quality time outdoors playing and exploring to satisfy their energy and curiosity needs. In that case, here are some things you’ll have to do to ensure your Beagle flourishes as an inside dog:



Provide regular exercise – Beagles can be great indoor dogs if they get enough outdoor time. Being highly energetic, they require lots of exercise daily. So, take them out for daily walks and play at the park. You’ll also need to provide some short but hardcore cardio exercises like running. Failure to do so and the dog will resort to destructive behaviors to release pent-up energy.

Train your Beagle – proper training is the key to having a well-behaved dog. You’ll need to teach them various basic commands, potty training, and crate training. Also, train your dog not to enter the kitchen and chew things, as well as to sleep on their bed, wear shock collars, etc.



Give them lots of love and attention – Beagles are loving, gentle, sweet, and very compassionate, and as such, expect lots of attention and affection. They also love companionship and will want to be around you all the time. Spend as much time as possible with your Beagle while you’re at home and if you have to leave, keep them entertained with interactive toys.

Can a Beagle Be Left Alone During the Day?

Beagles are true pack dogs and a highly sociable breed of dogs. They love to be around humans, dogs, and other animals. But while it would be great to stay with our four-legged friends at all times, this is not possible. We have work to go to, errands to run, kids to take care of, and so on. The fact is there will be times when you’ll have to leave your dog alone in the apartment unit. With their strong need for companionship, you may be wondering if you can leave your Beagle alone during the day.



The short answer is yes. However, it will require planning, training, and forethought to make it all work. The amount of time your dog can be left alone will depend on several things. For starters, puppies should be left alone for no more than two hours. An adult Beagle can manage 4-6 hours, although some are well-trained and can stay alone all day. Be sure to provide for their needs, such as food, water, and toys. Also, the dog will need to use the bathroom, so you must provide that for them.

If you leave your Beagle alone longer than the recommended time, they can become bored and restless. As mentioned earlier, this breed is very talkative and highly energetic, both of which come into play when left alone for too long. Your Beagle will resort to destructive behaviors such as excessive barking, chewing, digging, drooling, inappropriate pooping and peeing, and even trying to escape in search of companionship outside. Separation anxiety is another problem that may occur to your Beagle if left alone for too long.



Training Your Beagle to Be Alone

Practice leaving your Beagle friend alone when you’re around. Start by leaving them in a confined area like a playpen, crate, or selected room for around 30 minutes as you get on with your work. They will gradually learn to be alone and even understand that you’ll always be back for them. Make their time alone pleasant by providing for their needs. It’s a good idea to build up the time you leave your Beagle in the apartment, so start with just a few hours and gradually increase the time as your dog becomes comfortable. Having a second dog can be very helpful.

What Is the Best Dog for an Apartment Lifestyle?

Small size, friendly nature, adaptability, less shedding, and gentle temperament, are all good traits to look for when buying an apartment dog. Besides the Beagle, other apartment-friendly dog breeds include:



The English Bulldog – This small to medium-sized dog with a sweet disposition is more than happy to spend most of its time sleeping. This lack of interest in moving around much plays in favor of small apartment owners. They will barely bark, have a short coat that requires little maintenance, and are great with kids.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel – This one is petite, highly spirited, smart, graceful, playful, and have a gentle temperament. They are also good with kids and make excellent playmates. They do have long, furry coats that will require regular grooming to prevent excessive shedding.

Cocker Spaniels – They make good apartment dogs as they are petite, sociable, easily adaptable, and enjoy being part of the human family. Like their cousins Cavalier King Charles, they need regular grooming to keep their soft and lustrous coats in prime condition.

Pug – Pugs are among the best pets to have inside an apartment, along with cats and fish. They are a social breed, playful, and lively with a happy disposition. They spend most of their time napping, which makes them perfect apartment buddies.



Chihuahua – They are the ideal size for apartment living and call for minimal daily exercise. However, they will need the correct training process to prevent the yappy and fussy character they are known for.



Many more dog breeds are well-suited to live in an apartment. But before you get one, there are a few important things to consider to ensure they will be safe, happy, and healthy.

  • Does your apartment complex allow dogs? Is it dog-friendly?
  • Is your apartment spacious enough for both of you?
  • Are the neighbors okay with hearing the dog? Will they bark too much?
  • Is there a dog part nearby?

If the answers to these questions are not favorable for a dog, then it’s probably best you hold off on getting one until you’re living in a more dog-friendly situation.